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Night Shift Work, Genetic Risk, and Hypertension

  • Zhihao Xiao
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Cheng Xu
    Correspondence
    Cheng Xu, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, 101 Longmian Ave, Nanjing 211166, China.
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Qian Liu
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Gusu School, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Qing Yan
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Jingjia Liang
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Zhenkun Weng
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Xin Zhang
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Jin Xu
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Department of Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Dong Hang
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jiangsu Key Lab of Cancer Biomarkers, Prevention and Treatment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Personalized Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
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  • Aihua Gu
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Address to Aihua Gu, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, 101 Longmian Ave, Nanjing 211166, China.
    Affiliations
    State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

    Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, Center for Global Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
    Search for articles by this author

      Abstract

      Objective

      To perform a prospective cohort study to investigate whether night shift work is associated with incident hypertension and whether this association is modified by genetic susceptibility to hypertension because evidence on the association between night shift work and hypertension is insufficient.

      Methods

      A total of 232,665 participants of UK Biobank who were recruited from 2006 to 2010 and observed to January 31, 2018, were included in this study. A Cox proportional hazards model with covariate adjustment was performed to assess the association between night shift work exposure and hypertension risk. We constructed a polygenic risk score (PRS) for genetic susceptibility to hypertension, which was used to explore whether genetic susceptibility to hypertension modified the effect of night shift work. The robustness of the results was assessed by sensitivity analysis.

      Results

      Night shift workers had a higher hypertension risk than day shift workers, which increased with increasing frequency of night shift work (Ptrend<.001). The association was attenuated but still remained statistically significant in the fully adjusted model. We explored the joint effect of night shift work and genetic susceptibility on hypertension. Permanent night shift workers with higher hypertension PRSs had higher risk of hypertension than day workers with low PRSs.

      Conclusion

      Night shift work exposure was associated with increased hypertension risk, which was modified by the genetic risk for hypertension, indicating that there is a joint effect of night shift work and genetic risk on hypertension.

      Abbreviations and Acronyms:

      BMI (body mass index), CVD (cardiovascular disease), HR (hazard ratio), OR (odds ratio), PRS (polygenic risk score), RERI (relative excess risk due to interaction), SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism)
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