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Erratum to ‘Understanding Heart Failure Risk in a Diverse Cohort with Human Immunodeficiency Virus’

[Mayo Clinic Proceedings 97 (2022) 433–435]
      Erratum to ‘Understanding Heart Failure Risk in a Diverse Cohort With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection’ [Mayo Clinic Proceedings 97 (2022) 433–435]
      Christian Faaborg-Andersen, BS, Adrian daSilva-deAbreu, MD, MSc, PhD(c), Hector O. Ventura, MD
      Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA (C.F.-A.) Heart and Vascular Center Yale New Haven Hospital Section of Cardiovascular Medicine Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT (A.D.-D.) John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute Ochsner Medical Center New Orleans, LA (H.O.V.).
      The publisher regrets an error in the original article. The sentence “Whereas PWHs demonstrated an elevated rate of HFrEF similar to that found in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study, the adjusted rate of HFrEF was higher in the HIV Heart Study (HR, 1.76 [CI, 1.44 to 2.16] vs 1.21 [CI 1.03 to 1.41]), although it must be noted that in the past, HFrEF may have been under-diagnosed and its clinical relevance under-estimated. This may pose limitations in analyzing old registries,” the acronym ‘HFrEF’ should read ‘HFpEF’
      The correct sentence should read: ‘While PWH demonstrated an elevated rate of HFrEF similar to that found in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study, the adjusted rate of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) was higher in The HIV Heart Study (HR 1.76 CI 1.44-2.16 vs. 1.21 CI 1.03-1.41), although it must be noted that in the past, HFpEF may have been underdiagnosed and its clinical relevance underestimated.’
      The publisher would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

      Linked Article

      • Understanding Heart Failure Risk in a Diverse Cohort With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection
        Mayo Clinic ProceedingsVol. 97Issue 3
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          After 4 decades of study and numerous therapeutic advancements, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can today be considered and managed as a chronic disease, and in some parts of the world, the life expectancy of persons living with HIV (PWHs) is comparable to that of persons living without such infection.1 Since it was discovered in the early 1980s, HIV has been known to affect the heart. As PWHs are living longer, their burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and their clinical relevance have grown, raising important questions about the pathophysiologic process through which the HIV affects the heart despite optimal treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART).
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