Advertisement
Mayo Clinic Proceedings Home

In reply—Commercial Cannabidiol Caution: A New Gold Rush

      We thank Scharf et al
      • Scharf E.L.
      • Ward A.M.
      • Ebbert J.O.
      Commercial cannabidiol caution: a new gold rush.
      for their thoughtful comments, which basically reinforce the cautionary notes we sounded in the original article.
      We also agree that the legal environment remains challenging, with state and federal laws regarding the legality of cannabidiol (CBD) often appearing to be in conflict. The fact that CBD is now available as a drug has led some authorities to state that it cannot simultaneously be a dietary supplement and hence the concerns raised by Scharf et al. However, to date, the Food and Drug Administration has not pursued this angle aggressively, and most of the action against CBD manufactures and/or sellers has been in response to unsubstantiated medical claims. The Food and Drug Administration has announced plans to release new guidance in the near future. Pending that announcement, we appear to be in limbo, where CBD remains readily available to consumers while government agencies continue to debate its long-term fate.
      The fact that manufactures and sellers of CBD often make unsubstantiated medical claims was noted in our article but bears repeating.
      We also noted that the CBD market is crowded with many products that do not contain the ingredients or the amounts found on the label. To help guide patients who choose to use a CBD or hemp oil product, we included in our article a section titled “Finding a Quality Product” to help offer guidance for consumers navigating this burgeoning market.
      We also appreciate the added cautionary notes provided by Scharf et al with regard to the extra risks associated with vaping CBD (or any substance). Given space limitations, we were not able to discuss the many forms of CBD in detail and so we are grateful for the opportunity to echo the concerns about vaping in particular.

      Reference

        • Scharf E.L.
        • Ward A.M.
        • Ebbert J.O.
        Commercial cannabidiol caution: a new gold rush.
        Mayo Clin Proc. 2020; 95: 200

      Linked Article

      • Commercial Cannabidiol Caution: A New Gold Rush
        Mayo Clinic ProceedingsVol. 95Issue 1
        • Preview
          We recently read with interest the review by VanDolah et al1 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, summarizing the emerging landscape of commercially available cannabidiol (CBD) preparations, which are now subject to consumption by the general public because of the purported health benefits of CBD. We agree with the authors in that an open discussion exploring patient use of such substances is necessary for a complete history as well as for establishing patient rapport. We would add a word of caution about the use of products and would also suggest readers of Mayo Clinic Proceedings consider additional factors when discussing commercial CBD use with patients.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Clinicians’ Guide to Cannabidiol and Hemp Oils
        Mayo Clinic ProceedingsVol. 94Issue 9
        • Preview
          Cannabidiol (CBD) oils are low tetrahydrocannabinol products derived from Cannabis sativa that have become very popular over the past few years. Patients report relief for a variety of conditions, particularly pain, without the intoxicating adverse effects of medical marijuana. In June 2018, the first CBD-based drug, Epidiolex, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of rare, severe epilepsy, further putting the spotlight on CBD and hemp oils. There is a growing body of preclinical and clinical evidence to support use of CBD oils for many conditions, suggesting its potential role as another option for treating challenging chronic pain or opioid addiction.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
        Open Access