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Lipoma

      This soft-tissue tumor was removed from the thigh. The photograph shows a cross section of a well-delineated, irregularly lobulated, pale yellow lipoma.
      What is most accurate regarding lipomas?
      • a.
        Lipomas are usually identified in children and are rare in adults
      • b.
        Lipomas frequently have chromosomal aberrations
      • c.
        Multiple lipomas are more common than solitary lipomas
      • d.
        Most lipomas occur in the setting of a genetic syndrome
      Answer: b. Lipomas frequently have chromosomal aberrations
      Lipomas are benign, often asymptomatic tumors that are most often identified in adults. Lipomas are usually subcutaneous or superficial, and deep lipomas are less common. Although benign, most lipomas are associated with chromosomal aberrations. Aberrations involving 12q13-15 are common in conventional lipomas and may involve the HMGA2 gene, but other chromosomal aberrations can also occur.
      • Bartuma H.
      • Hallor K.H.
      • Panagopoulos I.
      • et al.
      Assessment of the clinical and molecular impact of different cytogenetic subgroups in a series of 272 lipomas with abnormal karyotype.
      • Gamez J.
      • Playan A.
      • Andreu A.L.
      • et al.
      Familial multiple symmetric lipomatosis associated with the A8344G mutation of mitochondrial DNA.
      Most lipomas are solitary tumors, but multiple lipomas can occur, including in syndromes such as familial multiple lipomatosis.

      References

        • Bartuma H.
        • Hallor K.H.
        • Panagopoulos I.
        • et al.
        Assessment of the clinical and molecular impact of different cytogenetic subgroups in a series of 272 lipomas with abnormal karyotype.
        Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2007; 46: 594-606
        • Gamez J.
        • Playan A.
        • Andreu A.L.
        • et al.
        Familial multiple symmetric lipomatosis associated with the A8344G mutation of mitochondrial DNA.
        Neurology. 1998; 51: 258-260