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Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Breast and Colon Cancer Survivors Relative to Adults Without Cancer

  • Joyce W. Shi
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

    Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Robert J. MacInnis
    Affiliations
    Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

    Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Terry Boyle
    Affiliations
    School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

    Cancer Control Research, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
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  • Jeff K. Vallance
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Health Disciplines, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Canada
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  • Elisabeth A.H. Winkler
    Affiliations
    School of Public Health, Cancer Prevention Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Brigid M. Lynch
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Address to Brigid M. Lynch, PhD, Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.
    Affiliations
    Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

    Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

    Physical Activity Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia
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Published:February 06, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2016.12.015

      Abstract

      Objective

      To assess differences in accelerometer-assessed moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity, and sedentary time between cancer survivors and adults without cancer.

      Patients and Methods

      Accelerometer data collected from 241 breast cancer survivors (ACCEL-Breast study, 2013) and 171 colon cancer survivors (ACCEL-Colon study, 2012-2013) were pooled with data collected from adults without cancer (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle accelerometer substudy, 2011-2012). Linear regression was used to estimate differences in physical activity and sedentary behavior levels between cancer survivors and adults without cancer, adjusted for potential confounding factors.

      Results

      The mean MVPA was significantly higher among breast cancer survivors than among females who had not had cancer (29 vs 22 min/d; P<.001). Colon cancer survivors had significantly lower levels of light activity than did adults without cancer (311 vs 338 min/d; P<.001), more sedentary time (532 vs 507 min/d; P=.003), and more prolonged sedentary time (210 vs 184 min/d; P=.002).

      Conclusion

      Contrary to findings from previous research (based on self-reported physical activity), cancer survivors engaged in more (breast) or equivalent (colon) MVPA compared with adults without cancer. Differences between colon cancer survivors and adults without cancer for light activity and sedentary behavior highlight the importance of considering the full activity spectrum in the context of cancer control.

      Abbreviations and Acronyms:

      AusDiab (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle), BMI (body mass index), cpm (counts per minute), MVPA (moderate to vigorous physical activity), WA (Western Australia)
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