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In Reply—Body Fat Percentage Should Not Be Confused With Lifestyle Behaviors

      We appreciate the opportunity to respond to the letter submitted by Mr Kyle and Dr Stanford in reference to our recently published article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
      • Loprinzi P.D.
      • Branscum A.
      • Hanks J.
      • Smit E.
      Healthy lifestyle characteristics and their joint association with cardiovascular disease biomarkers in US adults.
      Kyle and Stanford raise several points that do not accurately represent our methods or study conclusions. As such, we appreciate having the opportunity to clarify and expound upon our differing opinions.
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      References

        • Loprinzi P.D.
        • Branscum A.
        • Hanks J.
        • Smit E.
        Healthy lifestyle characteristics and their joint association with cardiovascular disease biomarkers in US adults.
        Mayo Clin Proc. 2016; 91: 432-442
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        Body mass index, the most widely used but also widely criticized index: would a criterion standard measure of total body fat be a better predictor of cardiovascular disease mortality?.
        Mayo Clin Proc. 2016; 91: 443-455
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      Linked Article

      • Healthy Lifestyle Characteristics and Their Joint Association With Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers in US Adults
        Mayo Clinic ProceedingsVol. 91Issue 4
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          To estimate the prevalence of healthy lifestyle characteristics and to examine the association between different combinations of healthy lifestyle characteristics and cardiovascular disease biomarkers.
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      • Body Fat Percentage Should Not Be Confused With Lifestyle Behaviors
        Mayo Clinic ProceedingsVol. 91Issue 6
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          In their article “Healthy lifestyle characteristics and their joint association with cardiovascular disease biomarkers in US adults,” Loprinzi et al1 conclude that “only 2.7% of all adults have the characteristics of a healthy lifestyle.” Unfortunately, their conclusion is undermined by their analysis, which categorizes body fat percentage as a “healthy lifestyle characteristic” and as a “positive health behavior.” Although the other 3 characteristics used as primary end points in this analysis—physical activity, a healthy diet, and nonsmoking status—are important health behaviors, body fat percentage is not.
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