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Treatment of Early Parkinson's Disease: Are Complicated Strategies Justified?

  • J. Eric Ahlskog
    Correspondence
    Address reprint requests to Dr. J. E. Ahlskog, Department of Neurology, Mayo C1inic Rochester, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology and Division of Movement Disorders, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota
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      A variety of medical treatment strategies have been proposed as a means of slowing the progression of Parkinson's disease. This includes administration of selegiline (deprenyl) therapy, early use of bromocriptine or pergolide, and delay of levodopa therapy or restriction of the dose. There is no compelling evidence supporting the use of any of these treatment strategies for this purpose. Carbidopa-levodopa remains the most potent medication for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. Although starting levodopa therapy with the controlled-release formulation is advocated, this does not appear to have any major advantages over standard carbidopa-levodopa. Further studies are needed to identify other means of halting the progression of Parkinson's disease.
      CR (controlled-release), DATATOP (Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism), MAO-B (monoamine oxidase B), MPTP (I-methyl-4-phenyl-l,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine)
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